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Your search has returned 170 articles:
  • Buildings may be chasing L.A.’s fog away

    Heavy low-lying clouds of water — also known as fog — had been a familiar morning sight along much of coastal Southern California. But fog no longer occurs there as often as it used to. The reason? A half-century surge of building has transformed the area into a heat sink, new data indicate.City planners refer to this building as “urbanization.” The transformation of wildlands into cities and...
    07:00 AM, March 5, 2015 Weather & Climate
  • The steady creep of less sleep

    Tweens and teens report getting less and less sleep with each passing year. The disturbing trend comes from data collected over the past 20 years from U.S. students.As of 2012, more than half of the surveyed kids age 15 or older reported sleeping less than seven hours a night. That is two to three hours less sleep than doctors and others recommend. Sleep is essential, especially for young kids...
    10:12 AM, February 19, 2015 Body & Health
  • Snakes may have slithered amongst Jurassic dinos

    The oldest known snake held a sssssurprising secret: its age. A new study of ancient snake skulls suggests this animal may have been around 167 million years ago. That would mean it likely slithered during the Jurassic Period. For perspective, that would have been roughly 100 million years before Tyrannosaurus rex ruled.Until now, the record fossil snake was 100 million years old. Its bones...
    08:00 AM, February 11, 2015 Dinosaurs & Fossils
  • Screen time can mess with the body’s ‘clock’

    For a good night’s sleep, here is some expert advice: Turn off, turn in and drop off.Anyone who does the opposite — say, turning on an iPad or other similar electronic reader in bed — may have a harder time both dropping off to sleep and shaking that groggy feeling the next morning. That’s the conclusion of a new study.Sleep experts at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass., found that the...
    07:00 AM, February 9, 2015 Body & Health
  • U.S. outbreak of measles emerges

    Measles loves a crowd. Some visitors to southern California theme parks have just learned this the hard way.Epidemiologists are disease detectives. They trace sources of disease. And they have just tracked a major outbreak of measles to two Disney theme parks. Tens of thousands of people each day visit these parks from all over the world. That can give any contagious virus access to plenty of new...
    13:55 PM, February 6, 2015 Body & Health
  • 10 things to know about measles

    Many people think that measles, a disease that once hit nearly every child, has disappeared — at least in the United States. It hasn’t. And people who were never vaccinated face the primary risk of getting it. Here’s what you should know.1. Measles can make people very sick.It typically causes fever, coughs, runny nose, pinkeye and a distinctive rash. It also can lead to pneumonia (the most...
    13:46 PM, February 6, 2015 Body & Health
  • Distant pollution may intensify U.S. twisters

    Sooty smoke drifting across the Gulf of Mexico may be able to boost the strength of twisters forming in and around North America’s “Tornado Alley.” That’s the finding of a new study.It comes from analyzing a particularly severe April 27, 2011, tornado outbreak. On that one day, 122 twisters plowed across the southeastern United States. Fifteen especially violent ones roared through with wind...
    07:00 AM, February 5, 2015 Weather & Climate, Environment & Pollution
  • Tides may regularly swamp many U.S. cities

    Strong storms and high winds sometimes bring floods to coastal areas. But more and more often, cities and towns along the U.S. East Coast are flooding even in calm, sunny weather.Among them: Maryland’s capital — Annapolis, home to the U.S. Naval Academy. Tourists there must sometimes wade through water flooding downtown streets surrounding the harbor. From time to time, water covers roads in...
    07:15 AM, January 23, 2015 Earth, Weather & Climate
  • Air pollution can mess with our DNA

    Air pollution can make it hard to breathe. It also can increase someone’s blood pressure and heart rate. Those problems are well known. Now research suggests breathing diesel fumes can trigger another toxic change. It can inappropriately turn some genes on, while turning others off.A gene is a segment of DNA that tells cells of the body what to do — and when. Genes can be controlled by a type of...
    07:00 AM, January 22, 2015 Body & Health, Environment & Pollution, Chemistry
  • A whale of a lifespan

    Bowhead whales can live 200 years or longer. How they do it is no longer among the secrets of the deep.Scientists have mapped the genetic code of this long-lived whale species. The international effort found unusual features in the Arctic whale’s genes. Those features likely protect the species against cancer and other problems related to old age. The researchers hope their findings will one day...
    07:00 AM, January 20, 2015 Animals, Body & Health

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