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E.g., 04/02/2015
Your search has returned 3270 articles:
  • Doing Science

    Broadcom MASTERS alumni attends Cambridge University Scholar Program

    Maria Elena Grimmett, a two-time Broadcom MASTERS Finalist (2011 – 2012) and two-time Intel ISEF Grand Award Winner (2013 – 2014), traveled to Cambridge University in England during mid-March to explore scientific discovery and its influence on literature. The recipient of the 2012 Broadcom MASTERS Mathematics Award, Maria Elena used her award money to cover the expenses of a once in a lifetime...
    04:30 AM, April 2, 2015
  • Cooking up life for the first time

    Which came first? That is a basic question about the origins of life. Forget the chicken and the egg, though. Scientists are more interested in how and when the basic parts of a living cell first appeared. Ever.Now chemists may have the answer. A set of chemical reactions on the surface of ancient Earth could have made the building blocks, researchers say. And they could have done it all at once....
    07:00 AM, April 1, 2015 Chemistry, Microbes, Fungi & Algae, Earth
  • Doing Science

    Sixteen years later, youngest Intel STS top winner returns to speak to finalists

    In 1999, Natalia Toro became the youngest Intel Science Talent Search top winner. She was 14. Natalia is now a particle physicist on the faculty of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics whose research focuses on finding new ways to test our understanding of the laws of nature.  Natalia studied physics and mathematics as an undergraduate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology,...
    09:27 AM, March 31, 2015
  • New mirror picky in what it reflects

    Mirrors need not give you the full picture. A new type of mirror can pick and choose what to reflect. For instance, it can selectively reflect a single wavelength of light. All others pass right through — as if the mirror was transparent. Such technology could be used to create more efficient satellite antennas.Details appeared March 6 in the journal Physical Review Letters.The mirror is...
    07:00 AM, March 31, 2015 Physics, Space
  • Doing Science

    SSP alums shine at 2015 White House Science Fair

    When it came to getting into the White House Science Fair, Holly Jackson had it all sewed up. Nikhil Behari, too, had just the right touch. And as for meeting President Barack Obama in person, it sent chills running up and down Harry Paul’s spine.“No pun intended,” says Paul, who along with Jackson and Behari, was among the more than 100 students invited to exhibit at the fifth White House...
    14:25 PM, March 30, 2015
  • Intel STS 2015

    Basic Research1st Place Noah Golowich2nd Place Brice Huang3rd Place Shashwat KishoreGlobal Good1st Place Andrew Jin2nd Place Kalia Firester3rd Place Anvita GuptaInnovation1st Place Michael Hofmann Winer2nd Place Saranesh Thanika Prembabu3rd Place Catherine LiAlumni Speaker Natalia ToroGlenn T. Seaborg Award Winner Emily AshkinIntel STS 2015 Winners Press ReleaseIntel STS 2015 Finalist BookIntel...
    14:02 PM, March 30, 2015
  • Eureka! Lab

    Scientists Say: Irruption

     Irruption (noun, “ear-RUPT-shun”, verb “to irrupt”)The word for when a group of organisms suddenly increases in number. This could mean that a population of animals has bred rapidly. It could also mean that a species is being seen where it is not usually found.In a sentence There may be a winter irruption of songbirds farther south than usual if seed crops in the north can’t support their...
    12:13 PM, March 30, 2015
  • Why you’ll never see a dirty gecko

    If you ever wear a self-cleaning jacket one day — and you may — it could have been inspired by a frozen lizard. A gecko, to be exact.Australian scientist Jolanta Watson had removed the carcass of a box-patterned gecko from her lab’s freezer to prepare it for an experiment. As she looked at it, she noticed tiny water droplets forming all over the gecko’s skin. Quickly, the droplets got bigger....
    07:00 AM, March 30, 2015 Animals, Technology & Engineering
  • Goopy tech leaves older 3-D printing in its wake

    A movie robot made of liquid metal that could take on any shape has inspired researchers to print three-dimensional objects from a puddle of goo.The new 3-D printing method manipulates ultraviolet (UV) light and oxygen to fuse liquid resin into solid objects. Those objects rise out of a shallow basin of resin in just minutes. That is far less time than required with conventional 3-D printers. The...
    07:00 AM, March 29, 2015 Chemistry, Technology & Engineering
  • Silencing genes — to understand them

    The DNA in each of us hosts about 21,000 genes. Their blueprints are coded in the roughly 3 billion rungs of our DNA’s ladder-like structure. The Human Genome Project finished decoding all of those genes in 2003. That task took hundreds of scientists more than 12 years.Scientists are now working fast and furiously to learn what each identified gene does. Their answers will help science better...
    07:15 AM, March 27, 2015 Body & Health

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