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  • Doing Science

    Get to know the Regeneron STS 2019 Scholars

    The Regeneron Science Talent Search scholars were selected from 1,964 applications received from over 600 high schools. The scholars were selected based on their exceptional research skills, commitment to academics, innovative thinking and promise as scientists. Naturally, this diversity would lead to varied skills and talents, both in STEM fields and in other areas. The scholars are amazing...

    12:20 PM, January 15, 2019
  • Doing Science

    STS 2019 Scholars by the Numbers

    The participants at this year’s Regeneron Science Talent Search, the nation’s premiere science competition, come from hundreds of schools, dozens of states and have thousands of hours of scientific research and study between them. The 300 scholars were determined from an applicant pool of nearly 2,000 students. The numbers are abound. Here are a few more statistics concerning the 2019...

    15:57 PM, January 11, 2019
  • Doing Science

    300 U.S. High School Students Named as Scholars in Regeneron Science Talent Search 2019

    Today, Jan. 9, 2019 at 12 p.m. EST, 300 high school seniors were named scholars in the Regeneron Science Talent Search, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science and math competition, founded and produced by Society for Science & the Public. Visit https://student.societyforscience.org/regeneron-sts-2019-scholars to see the full list of scholars, who were selected from an applicant...

    15:20 PM, January 9, 2019
  • Grievance Policy

    Each year, the Society for Science & the Public (the Society) affiliates approximately 420  regional, state and country fairs, from which winners are selected to attend ISEF. Each affiliated fair may send a pre-determined number of projects to ISEF (as factored by participation and high school population). 

    The Society outlines the rules and standards by which a Society-affiliated...

    15:18 PM, November 29, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Creating a noninvasive glucometer for diabetes

    It's imperative that diabetics measure their blood glucose levels (BGL) several times a day. To do so, they use a glucometer, which breaks the skin with a needle in order to draw blood. The blood is then deposited onto a testing strip, and the measuring device determines BGL.

    “For diabetics, this process of pricking the skin happens multiple times a day to monitor their BGL...

    09:00 AM, August 22, 2018
  • Doing Science

    There’s a moratorium on mass shooting research. This high school student is studying it herself.

    Mass shootings are a prevalent issue in America. A 1996 bill, which included the Dickey Amendment, has had a chilling effect on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) ability to research the link between firearm ownership and mass shootings in America. Elizabeth Shytle, an inquisitive high schooler from Columbia, South Carolina, wanted to fill in this statistical gap...

    09:00 AM, August 20, 2018
  • Doing Science

    An alum who combines engineering skills with a passion for Scandinavian folk music

    Matt Fichtenbaum (Intel ISEF 1962, Westinghouse STS 1962) has eclectic interests, ranging from art to science. He studied electronic engineering in college and began playing Scandinavian folk music on the nyckelharpa and Swedish fiddle after living in Sweden.

    His fascination with science and music began at an early age. Matt's parents always had music playing in the house, and he...

    09:00 AM, August 17, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Acai berries could transform this wasteland

    Urban growth in the Amazon is often unsupervised, unregulated, and organic, which leads to irregular housing, lack of infrastructure, and the use of improper materials for construction. These irregular housing communities are called favelas, and are constructed of concrete, bricks, steel bars, sand, and rock. In São Paolo and other regions of Brazil, a lack of resources and poverty has...

    09:00 AM, August 15, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Could clay work as a natural pesticide?

    Pesticides contain harsh chemicals, high levels of toxicity, and risks to human and environmental health. Despite these concerns, pesticides are perceived as necessary and are used generously in the U.S. agricultural industry.

    Anna Mathis, a high school student from Sandersville, Georgia, was concerned about the negative impact of pesticides. She studied the agricultural industry...

    09:00 AM, August 13, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Measuring antibiotic resistance among E. coli

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious issue facing both medical providers and patients.

    According to the World Health Organization, a growing number of infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and salmonella, are becoming harder to treat as the antibiotics used to treat them become less effective. Antibiotic resistance can lead to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs,...

    09:00 AM, August 8, 2018

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