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E.g., 09/22/2018
Your search has returned 4252 articles:
  • Doing Science

    Creating a noninvasive glucometer for diabetes

    It's imperative that diabetics measure their blood glucose levels (BGL) several times a day. To do so, they use a glucometer, which breaks the skin with a needle in order to draw blood. The blood is then deposited onto a testing strip, and the measuring device determines BGL.

    “For diabetics, this process of pricking the skin happens multiple times a day to monitor their BGL...

    09:00 AM, August 22, 2018
  • Doing Science

    There’s a moratorium on mass shooting research. This high school student is studying it herself.

    Mass shootings are a prevalent issue in America. A 1996 bill, which included the Dickey Amendment, has had a chilling effect on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) ability to research the link between firearm ownership and mass shootings in America. Elizabeth Shytle, an inquisitive high schooler from Columbia, South Carolina, wanted to fill in this statistical gap...

    09:00 AM, August 20, 2018
  • Doing Science

    An alum who combines engineering skills with a passion for Scandinavian folk music

    Matt Fichtenbaum (Intel ISEF 1962, Westinghouse STS 1962) has eclectic interests, ranging from art to science. He studied electronic engineering in college and began playing Scandinavian folk music on the nyckelharpa and Swedish fiddle after living in Sweden.

    His fascination with science and music began at an early age. Matt's parents always had music playing in the house, and he...

    09:00 AM, August 17, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Acai berries could transform this wasteland

    Urban growth in the Amazon is often unsupervised, unregulated, and organic, which leads to irregular housing, lack of infrastructure, and the use of improper materials for construction. These irregular housing communities are called favelas, and are constructed of concrete, bricks, steel bars, sand, and rock. In São Paolo and other regions of Brazil, a lack of resources and poverty has...

    09:00 AM, August 15, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Could clay work as a natural pesticide?

    Pesticides contain harsh chemicals, high levels of toxicity, and risks to human and environmental health. Despite these concerns, pesticides are perceived as necessary and are used generously in the U.S. agricultural industry.

    Anna Mathis, a high school student from Sandersville, Georgia, was concerned about the negative impact of pesticides. She studied the agricultural industry...

    09:00 AM, August 13, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Measuring antibiotic resistance among E. coli

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious issue facing both medical providers and patients.

    According to the World Health Organization, a growing number of infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and salmonella, are becoming harder to treat as the antibiotics used to treat them become less effective. Antibiotic resistance can lead to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs,...

    09:00 AM, August 8, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Science: A stepping stone to politics

    Science can be a good stepping stone into the political arena. Through science fairs, participants can gain important communication and public speaking skills. Conducting scientific research can teach patience, persistence, and how to overcome failure with grace. Moreover, a passion for science may easily translate into a political focus.

    Below, read about four alumni of Society for...

    09:00 AM, August 7, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Mary Fish and her zebrafish

    After an article about Mary Fish, a teacher at Spanish River High School in Boca Raton, Florida, was published in the Palm Beach Post, she received an interesting proposal from a local neuroscientist. Eric Duboué, an assistant professor of neuroscience, who works with zebrafish at Florida Atlantic University, was intrigued by Mary's work and contacted her. Eric wanted to see if Mary,...

    09:00 AM, August 2, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Incredible women entrepreneurs guiding young women into STEM

    From teaching young women to code to providing empowering dolls for kids, four Society for Science & the Public alumni — Pooja Chandrashekar, Anvita Gupta, Kavya Kopparapu, and Neha Chauhan Woodward — founded companies to inspire other young women to have the confidence to enter careers of their choice.

    Below, read stories about these incredible women in STEM.

    Pooja...
    09:00 AM, July 31, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Tapping into New York City with a publishing and tourism website

    Michelle Young (Intel STS 2000) is an adjunct professor of Architecture at Columbia University. She's also founder of Untapped Cities, a web magazine that helps people better explore New York City. The site catalogues and offers promotions on tours, member events, and information on architecture, arts, food, travel, and more.

    People can join Untapped Cities Insiders club for $5-$...

    09:00 AM, July 30, 2018

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