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E.g., 12/17/2018
E.g., 12/17/2018
Your search has returned 66 articles:
  • Doing Science

    Creating a noninvasive glucometer for diabetes

    It's imperative that diabetics measure their blood glucose levels (BGL) several times a day. To do so, they use a glucometer, which breaks the skin with a needle in order to draw blood. The blood is then deposited onto a testing strip, and the measuring device determines BGL.

    “For diabetics, this process of pricking the skin happens multiple times a day to monitor their BGL...

    09:00 AM, August 22, 2018
  • Doing Science

    There’s a moratorium on mass shooting research. This high school student is studying it herself.

    Mass shootings are a prevalent issue in America. A 1996 bill, which included the Dickey Amendment, has had a chilling effect on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) ability to research the link between firearm ownership and mass shootings in America. Elizabeth Shytle, an inquisitive high schooler from Columbia, South Carolina, wanted to fill in this statistical gap...

    09:00 AM, August 20, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Acai berries could transform this wasteland

    Urban growth in the Amazon is often unsupervised, unregulated, and organic, which leads to irregular housing, lack of infrastructure, and the use of improper materials for construction. These irregular housing communities are called favelas, and are constructed of concrete, bricks, steel bars, sand, and rock. In São Paolo and other regions of Brazil, a lack of resources and poverty has...

    09:00 AM, August 15, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Could clay work as a natural pesticide?

    Pesticides contain harsh chemicals, high levels of toxicity, and risks to human and environmental health. Despite these concerns, pesticides are perceived as necessary and are used generously in the U.S. agricultural industry.

    Anna Mathis, a high school student from Sandersville, Georgia, was concerned about the negative impact of pesticides. She studied the agricultural industry...

    09:00 AM, August 13, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Measuring antibiotic resistance among E. coli

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious issue facing both medical providers and patients.

    According to the World Health Organization, a growing number of infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and salmonella, are becoming harder to treat as the antibiotics used to treat them become less effective. Antibiotic resistance can lead to longer hospital stays, higher medical costs,...

    09:00 AM, August 8, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Mary Fish and her zebrafish

    After an article about Mary Fish, a teacher at Spanish River High School in Boca Raton, Florida, was published in the Palm Beach Post, she received an interesting proposal from a local neuroscientist. Eric Duboué, an assistant professor of neuroscience, who works with zebrafish at Florida Atlantic University, was intrigued by Mary's work and contacted her. Eric wanted to see if Mary,...

    09:00 AM, August 2, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Finding a natural source of medicine in waterfall plants

    When you think of western medicine, you wouldn’t necessarily think of herbs or other plant sources. But three high school students from rural Brevard, North Carolina believe we can find novel sources of natural medicine in plants, specifically those next to waterfalls. Plants in these areas, called spray cliffs, are constantly misted by the spray of water, making them vulnerable to...

    09:00 AM, July 24, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Why Science News in High Schools is so important to this neuropathologist

    Susan Staugaitis, M.D., Ph.D., a native of Newark, New Jersey and a longtime reader of Science News, knew from an early age that she wanted to become a scientist. She's relied on Science News since the early 1980s to stay informed.

    "This periodical has been a mainstay for my continuing education. The advances and discoveries in basic science are the foundation that fuels how the...

    10:30 AM, July 23, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Preventing domestic violence with smart technology

    Can domestic violence be prevented? Gabrielle Liu, a high school student from Nashville, Tennessee, believes so — through technological means.

    Gabrielle's high school science fair project focused on the challenges of detecting and preventing domestic violence. “It’s one of the most underreported social problems in the U.S. and abroad,” she said. “Social stigma and the possibility...

    09:00 AM, July 19, 2018
  • Doing Science

    Mentoring in the summer, this Advocate goes above and beyond to help students

    In the summer, teachers typically receive well-deserved respite. However, Charmain Brammer, a teacher at SUCCESS Academy DSU (Southern Utah Center for Computer, Engineering, and Science Students) in Saint George, Utah, comes into her school over the summer to meet with students she’s mentoring, encouraging their involvement in the sciences.

    Charmain works with 10th-11th grade...

    09:00 AM, July 17, 2018

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