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Your search has returned 10 articles:
  • Explainer: Tagging through history

    Scientists have been tagging wild animals for hundreds of years. The earliest devices consisted of little more than a rugged metal band. Biologists marked each band with a unique identification number. Once attached to the leg, ear or other part of the body of some critter, it became the animal’s “name.” Once released back into the wild, that animal might wear its nametag for a decade or longer....
    15:03 PM, February 19, 2014 Animals, Technology & Engineering
  • Kepler telescope can’t be fixed

    Since its launch on March 6, 2009, the $600 million Kepler space telescope has been hunting for planets outside Earth’s solar system. And to date, it’s turned up thousands.  But in July 2012, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced that one important part on the spacecraft had failed. In May of this year, a sister part failed. NASA initially hoped it might fix the broken...
    13:31 PM, August 23, 2013 Space
  • Supertiny satellites launched

    You don’t need a big satellite to do big science. Smaller satellites can cost less to make. So even small research teams can rather inexpensively rocket their instruments into orbit. One group has just launched tiny telescopes this way to study stars. The Hubble Space Telescope may be the most well-known instrument orbiting Earth today. It is also huge. At 13.2 meters long, it’s about the...
    14:45 PM, March 6, 2013 Technology & Engineering
  • Climate’s troublesome kids

    Rain starting falling on Chile in late May, 2002 — and just wouldn’t stop. Within days, the skies unleashed the heaviest rainfall this country had seen in more than a century. Towns flooded. Tens of thousands of people fled their homes. Thirteen people died. Clearly, this was no ordinary downpour. Scientists blamed the heavy rains on a climate disturbance in the ocean and atmosphere that...
    18:12 PM, January 30, 2013 Weather & Climate
  • Less ice, more seawater

    When an ice cube melts, it creates a puddle. When an ice sheet melts, it raises sea levels. It sounds simple, but scientists have debated for decades whether both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets actually were shrinking — and how much that melting contributed to rising sea levels. Now, a new study has provided the best evidence yet of how the polar ice sheets are responding to our warming...
    13:00 PM, December 20, 2012 Earth
  • Watching our seas rise

    Visit the beach on a hot afternoon and you may not realize it, but someone — or rather something — is watching from above. If you stand in the right place, the silent watcher’s invisible spotlight will pass right over you, like the spotlight of a police helicopter flitting overhead.That aerial observer zooming over your head is the Jason-2 satellite. It flies 1,340 kilometers (832 miles) high —...
    10:52 AM, November 8, 2012 Weather & Climate
  • A record Arctic melt

    During the winter, frozen sea ice covers most of the Arctic Ocean. Every summer, a portion of that ice melts away. Government scientists who keep track of those losses during the warmer months now report this summer has been one for the record books. On August 26, Arctic sea ice cover fell to 4.1 million square kilometers (about 1.6 million square miles). That’s the smallest ice cover ever...
    17:14 PM, September 10, 2012 Weather & Climate
  • Hot summer for a cold island

    A heat wave that struck Greenland in July was probably the biggest temperature surge there in more than 100 years, scientists report. The world’s largest island is mostly covered in ice and snow — except when extreme heat sets in. At one scientific research station, flags planted in the once-frozen snow fell over. Supply planes couldn’t land on the ice runway because it was melting too. “It was...
    11:00 AM, August 24, 2012 Weather & Climate
  • A Satellite of Your Own

    Going Deeper Hot Sites and Cool Books Recommended Web sites: You can learn more about CubeSat at littonlab.atl.calpoly.edu/ (California Polytechnic State University). Information about student CubeSat projects can be found at www.mae.cornell.edu/cubesat/ (Cornell University), eng.usna.navy.mil/~bruninga/cubesat.html (U.S. Naval Academy), www.space.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/cubesat/index-e.html (...
    19:06 PM, December 12, 2011 Other
  • Defining planethood

    Textbooks are supposed to be full of facts, but you can't always believe what you read. Especially when the topic is Pluto.Last August, after 75 years of planethood, Pluto lost its status when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) came up with a new definition of what it means to be a planet.Does Pluto belong among the planets of the solar system? Or is it one of the other types of bodies?...
    00:00 AM, February 20, 2007 Space

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